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Category Archives: Division Page: EXPLORE

Recordings for ArtBreak Season 2021-2022

 

 

If you missed an ArtBreak lecture from our Celebrating the Landmarks 2021-2022 series, enjoy viewing the recorded (and slightly abridged) sessions below.

If you would like to attend other lectures in the series, please register here.

 

 

Recorded ArtBreak Lecture: March 2022
Recorded ArtBreak Lecture: December 2021
Recorded ArtBreak Lecture: November 2021
Recorded ArtBreak Lecture: October 2021

Watch This!

Through the years, M&G has developed topical videos to support the educational themes of our diverse exhibitions and outreaches.  Enjoy learning about the people of the past through these varied glimpses.

Joseph: The Favored Son
Moses: The Hope of Israel
The High Renaissance: Raphael
The High Renaissance: Leonardo da Vinci
The High Renaissance: Michelangelo
The Brownings: Part 1
The Brownings: Part 2
Why Do We Create?
Why Do We Collect?
Sharing Art-Related Memories
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Gentlemen
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Conan Doyle & Henry Irving
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Women
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Caroline Norton & Angela Burdett-Coutts
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Darwin & Intelligent Design
The Charleston Silver Lady
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Theatre of the Mind
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Inspiring Character
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Lightbearers
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Charles Dickens Social Realism Novels
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: A Christmas Carol
Frederic James Shields: The Pre-Raphaelites
Symbols in Religious Art: The Four Apostles
Symbols in Religious Art: Prominent Bible Characters
Symbols in Religious Art: Attributes of the Martyrs
Symbols in Religious Art: Earthly Saints and Heavenly Spirits
Symbols in Religious Art: Representations of Deity
The Life of Martin Luther
The Art of Sleuthing: Conservation
Ten Most Forged Artists
Han van Meegeren: Part 1
Han van Meegeren: Part 2
Han van Meegeren: Part 3
Lost Art: The Cassirer Family
Lost Art: The Bendel Family
Lost Art: The Bloch-Bauer Family
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: The Discovery
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: Authentication
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: Verdict
Mannerism: An Introduction
Mannerism: Characteristics
Mannerism: Conclusion
Baroque Art: Introduction
Baroque Art: Prominent Schools
Baroque Art: Stylistic Scope
Baroque Art: Conclusion

A Closer Look

Take a closer look at objects in the collection to discover fascinating details in the materials, narrative, or artists. Each clip will help you better understand the past as well as enjoy the objects in M&G’s collection.

Allegory on the Fall and Redemption of Man: Lucas Cranach, the Younger
The Risen Christ: Gerard David
Madonna and Child with Saints: Niccolò di Pietro Gerini
Antonio Checchi (called Guidaccio da Imola): The Coronation of the Virgin
Jacopo Robusti (called Il Tintoretto): The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to Solomon
Rembrandt van Rijn (school of): Head of Christ
David de Haen: The Mocking of Christ
Jan Boeckhorst: Adoration of the Magi
Jan Victors: Esther Accusing Haman
Eyre Crowe: Wittenberg, October 31, 1517
Francesco Fracanzano: The Tribulation of Job
Giovanni Antonio Bazzi: Procession to Calvary
Domenico Fiasella: The Flight into Egypt
French Stained Glass: The Fountain of Life
Christ the Redeemer: Paris Bordone
Madonna and Child: Master of the Greenville Tondo
John the Baptist: Polychromed Sculpture
Gaspar de Crayer: St. Augustine & St. Ambrose
Edwin Long: Vashti Refuses the King’s Summons
Louis Comfort Tiffany: Inspiration
Govaert Flinck: Solomon’s Prayer for Wisdom
Simon Vouet: Salome with the Head of John the Baptist
Francesco Granacci: Rest on the Flight into Egypt
Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, called Sandro Botticelli (and studio): Madonna and Child with an Angel
Jusepe de Ribera: Ecce Homo
Gustave Doré: Christ Leaving the Praetorium
Girolamo Della Robbia: Terracotta Busts
Mattia Preti: Christ Seats the Child in the Midst of the Disciples
Peter Paul Rubens: Christ on the Cross
Cassone: Renaissance Marriage Chest
Francesco de Rosa: The Martyrdom of St. Lawrence
Guido Reni: The Four Evangelists
Geritt van Honthorst: The Holy Family in the Carpenter Shop
Francois de Troy: Christ and the Samaritan Woman
Francesco Cavazzoni: Legend of the Finding of the True Cross
Giovanni Filippo Criscuolo (attr. to): The Last Judgment
Stefano Cernotto (attr. to): The Last Supper
Salvator Rosa: Landscape with the Baptism of Christ
Domenico Zampieri: St. John the Evangelist
Jaun de Flandes: St. Augustine and St.Roch
Jan Hermansz. van Bijlert: Mary Magdalene Turning from the World to Christ
Anthony van Dyck: Mother of Sorrows (Mater Dolorosa)
Jan Swart: Nativity Triptych
Jan Gossaert: The Madonna of the Fireplace
Northern Mannerism: The Martyrdom of Peter
Marietta Robusti: Allegory of Wisdom
Philippe de Champaigne: The Christ of Derision
The Easter Story: Two Centurions
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History in Pictures

Art is a record of ideas and messages from the past by reflecting its own time and culture. Sometimes art’s culture is foreign to our own experiences and understanding today, which requires a translation in order for us to grasp the meaning of its intent and the significance in its time. Listen and learn about works of art and their context from M&G’s collection and others—it’s an opportunity to view the world beyond your twenty-first-century perspective and experience.

 

Giuseppe Arcimboldo
Sébastien Bourdon
Giovanni Coli and Filippo Gherardi
Procession to Calvary
Torah Scroll
Gerrit van Honthorst
Scenes from the Life of Christ
St. Nicholas, the Wonderworker
1965 Gala Opening for M&G
Reliquary Head of a Monk
Ginevra Cantofoli
Michail Nicholaievich Molodeshin
Pompeo Batoni
William Hamilton, R.A.
Jan Gossaert, called Mabuse (attr. to)
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (school of)
Louis XVI Musical Mantel Clock
Peter Paul Rubens (follower of)
Jacopo Robusti, called Il Tintoretto
Two Angels with Banner
Domenico Zampieri, called Il Domenichino
Anthony van Dyck
Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Benjamin West, P.R.A.
Carlo Francesco Nuvolone
Carlo Dolci
Peter Carl Fabergé
Vasiliy Fedotovich Il’in
Edwin Long, R. A.
Hezekiah Tapestry Series
Master of the Borghese Tondo
John Koch
Bone Casket
Rutilio di Lorenzo Manetti
Richard Houston (engraver)
Salvator Rosa
Pietro Novelli
Johann Friedrich Overbeck
Benjamin West, P. R. A.
Albrecht Dürer
Gaspar de Crayer
Lucas Cranach, the Younger
Frans Francken, the Younger
Visiting Museums
Eyre Crowe
Gustave Doré
Niccolò di Pietro Gerini
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Object of the Month: July 2022

King David Playing the Harp

Oil on canvas, c. 1630s

Simon Vouet

French, 1590-1649

 

The creator of this moving portrait of King David is Simon Vouet, one of the most influential French Baroque masters. He was the son of painter Laurent Vouet. Although little is known of the elder Vouet’s work, Simon’s oeuvre is well documented, for his prodigious talent emerged at an early age. At 14 he was sent to England to work as a portraitist. Then in his early twenties he moved to Constantinople where he spent two years before traveling to Venice and finally settling in Rome. Vouet’s career flourished in Italy. During this time, he received numerous prestigious commissions, and in 1624 he became president of Rome’s renowned Accademia di San Luca.

In 1626 he married Italian artist Virginia Vezzi who was regarded as one of Italy’s best miniaturists. The painting to the right (perhaps a self-portrait) is attributed to her. A year after their marriage, the couple returned to France at the request of Louis XIII who promptly appointed Simon official court painter. Vouet became a dominating force in Paris. He was so prolific that it is difficult to create a clear timeline of all the altarpieces, mythological, and devotional works he produced. As one biographer noted, Vouet was a natural academic who studied and absorbed everything in his environment, from the rich color palette of Veronese to the dramatic lighting effects of Caravaggio.

King David, the subject of this portrait, was one of Israel’s most gifted (and complex) kings. He is unique among Old Testament figures by virtue of the fact that he is “fully known.” His remarkable biography is well documented in I and II Samuel, but it is his innermost thoughts revealed through his more than 70 lyric poems (or psalms) that render him most lifelike. Here we come to know “the man after God’s own heart” who despite this intimate relationship with God sins egregiously. Vouet’s masterful technique powerfully captures the complexity of David’s personality.

Although initially captivated by the dramatic naturalism of the Italian Caravaggisti, by the time Vouet returned to Paris, he had integrated classical elements into his painting style. For example, in this portrait the dramatic compositional line and naturalistic portrayal of the aging King is offset by the figure’s classical pose and the diffused (rather than stark) lighting. This stylistic integration of the dramatic and restrained is well-suited to the dualism of the portrait’s iconography.

Color symbolism was prevalent in 16th-century religious art, and often a single color would have more than one meaning. Here, Vouet uses vibrant red and yellow gold fabrics not only to accentuate David’s kingly wealth but also to insinuate the frailty of his nature. In religious iconography, red can symbolize both love and hate, yellow gold sacredness or treachery. All of these qualities are interwoven into David’s complicated history and readily acknowledged by him in his Psalms. In addition, Vouet masterfully captures the emotional depth of “Israel’s singer of songs”(II Samuel 23:1). Notice the intricate detail in the weathered face and hands; notice, too, the tear in the psalmist’s eye as he gazes heavenward and prays. It’s as if we hear him plead: “Hear my prayer, O Lord, and give ear unto my cry; hold not thy peace at my tears: for I am a stranger with thee, and a sojourner, as all my fathers were” (Psalm 39:12). It is not surprising that the harp, David’s attribute, has come to symbolize not just the Psalms but all songs and music created to honor God.

Donnalynn Hess, Director of Education

 

Published 2022

M&G Coloring Pages

For students of ALL ages: click and print the coloring sheet, then find inspiration in the Old Master’s original to create your own version!  Share your work with others on social media and tag the Museum & Gallery!  

Esther Accusing Haman by Jan Victors, Dutch (1619–after 1676)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heavenly Shepherd by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Spanish (1617–1682)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Sold into Bondage by His Brethren by Giovanni Battista Carlone, Genoese (1603–1684)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE. 

 

Rest on the Flight to Egypt by Francesco Granacci, Florentine (1469–1543)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madonna of the Chair by Unknown (copy of Raphael)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE

Think on These Things

Due to COVID-19, our regular routines and social interactions have been disrupted. However, in the face of change and the unknown, what our minds dwell on becomes critical. While beauty has always mattered in our lives, perhaps it shows itself all the more valuable and significant in a crisis. Pause to reflect on a few, beautiful images and ideas represented in M&G’s Collection—things worthy of our thinking.

Whatsoever Things Are… True: St. Paul
Whatsoever Things Are… True: Christ and the Samaritan Woman
Whatsoever Things Are… Honorable: Ananias Restores Sight to Saul
Whatsoever Things Are… Honorable: The Good Samaritan
Whatsoever Things Are… Just: St. Michael the Archangel and St. Agnes
Whatsoever Things Are… Just: Triumphal Entry
Whatsoever Things Are… Just: The Last Supper
Whatsoever Things Are… Just: The Man of Sorrows
Whatsoever Things Are… Just: Painted Crucifix
Whatsoever Things Are… Pure: The Risen Christ
Whatsoever Things Are… Pure: Christ Blessing
Whatsoever Things Are… Lovely: The Heavenly Shepherd
Whatsoever Things Are… Lovely: Christ Healing the Blind Man
Whatsoever Things Are… Commendable: Christ and the Roman Centurion
Whatsoever Things Are… Commendable: The Tribulation of Job
Whatsoever Things Are… Excellent: Mary Magdalene Turning from the World to Christ
Whatsoever Things Are… Excellent: Isaiah’s Lips Anointed with Fire
Whatsoever Things Are… Worthy of Praise: King David Playing the Harp
Whatsoever Things Are… Worthy of Praise: God the Father

From the Director

Since M&G closed its two museum sites in February 2017, we’ve busily pursued some creative ideas and valuable feedback about the Old Master collection and M&G’s re-opening.  Watch the most recent video to follow our updates and learn about M&G’s focus and next steps in our service to you!

ArtBreak Podcast: Season 2020-2021

 

ArtBreak 2020-2021

During Covid19, M&G adapted our monthly ArtBreak to a different format—a podcast to enjoy on any personal break!  Like our normal in-person lunch and lecture construct, you’ll hear various M&G staff members and guests for each, roughly 35-minute program—in the comfort and safety of your own surroundings. Listen to these monthly features below or find us on Spotify or Apple Podcasts!

Note: M&G is planning to return to our in-person programming October 2021.

 

September 10, 2020—What is ArtBreak?

 

October 8, 2020—Gut Reaction: Favorites in M&G’s Collection

 

November 12, 2020—On Location: Closing & Opening an Exhibition

 

December 10, 2020—Gut Reaction: What is your favorite Christmas-themed artwork?

 

January 14, 2021—Conversation with a Conservator

 

February 11, 2021—A Conversation: What is Museum on the Move?

 

March 11, 2021—Insights: What Artist(s) do you think should be a household name?

 

April 8, 2021—On Looking at Art

Click on the links below, if you would like to see the described works from the April podcast:
Linda McCray
Lucas Cranach, the Younger
Priscilla Roberts

 

May 13, 2021—Gut Reaction: Art Experiences to Remember

Collection on View

View Paintings from the Museum & Gallery Old Master Collection

While the Museum & Gallery is closed to the public and unable to offer public viewing hours, we continue removing the collection in preparation for moving to a new building and new location. Meanwhile, you can still see selected masterworks on display in these campus locations:

 

Gustafson Fine Arts Center: Atrium

Public Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 AM-5 PM or by tour request

Luther’s Journey:  Experience the History commemorates Luther’s posting his 95 Theses—an act that changed the world.  His probing questions about man’s ultimate purpose, potential, and place in the world are still central to our own time and culture.  Luther’s life journey reminds us that ordinary people can be used by God to inspire extraordinary and enduring change.

 

War Memorial Chapel

Open only by appointment or tour request

The Benjamin West Collection
The seven paintings that hang in the War Memorial Chapel constitute the largest assemblage today of works by Benjamin West, the father of American painting.